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Religious Education

INTENT

At Norwich Road Academy, we have designed our R.E. curriculum with the intent that our pupils must have the foundations to become respectful adults.  We motivate them to be the very best they can be confident communicators, global citizens, to take opportunities to extend their horizons and develop the resilience to overcome any obstacles in life.

These values are central to our Academy vision: 

Be Proud - Connect -Empower – Motivate – Aspire – Transform

Religious Education is unique in the school curriculum in that it is neither a core subject nor a foundation subject but the 1988 Education Act states that ‘Religious Education has equal standing in relation to core subjects of the National Curriculum in that it is compulsory for all registered pupils.

Religious Education is taught in our school because it makes:

“a major contribution to the education of children and young people. At its best, it is intellectually challenging and personally enriching. It helps young people develop beliefs and values, and promotes the virtues of respect and empathy, which are important in our diverse society. It fosters civilised debate and reasoned argument, and helps pupils to understand the place of religion and belief in the modern world”.  (RE: realising the potential, Ofsted 2013).

This fits with our school ethos of ‘Building our love of learning together.’

At Norwich Road Academy we deliver RE in line with the Norfolk Agreed Syllabus. We use the agreed syllabus in line with the Diocese of Norwich programme to support our Scheme of Work (https://www.dioceseofnorwich.org/schools/siams-re-collective-worship/religious-education/curriculum-planning/).

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Legal requirements for Religious Education:

Religious Education is a statutory subject of the curriculum for all pupils in each year group and ‘should be provided for all registered pupils except those withdrawn at the request of their parents.’ (s 71 SSFA 1998)

Parents have the right to request that their child be excused from all or part of the RE provided at school.

The syllabus should ‘reflect the fact that the religious traditions in Great Britain are in the main Christian, while taking account of the teaching and practices of the other principal religions represented in Great Britain.’ (s375 (3) Education Act 1996)

We ensure that we comply with the legal requirements by following the Norfolk Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education and Understanding Christianity:   Text, Impact, and Connections.

Religious Education is generally taught on an every other half term basis.

Lessons are planned and delivered in a variety of ways ensuring that all children can access and participate in lessons. Interactive, practical activities encourage the children to discuss their ideas and extend their understanding of difficult concepts and challenging questions.

Pupils’ progress in RE is based on the expected outcomes outlined in the Agreed Syllabus and in Understanding Christianity, which in turn have been developed in line with guidance produced nationally. 

We track individual pupil’s progress using pupil asset, whilst also bearing in mind that the statements do not cover all aspects of teaching and learning in RE. For example, pupil’s personal views and ideas are not subject to formal assessment, and yet are central to good RE.

Progress in RE is reported annually to parents in the end of year report.

 

IMPACT

Religious Education at Norwich Road Academy develops pupils' knowledge and understanding of, and their ability to respond to, Christianity,

 

  • other principal world religions, other religious traditions and world views;
  • understanding and respect for different religions, beliefs, values and traditions (including ethical life stances), through exploring issues within and between faiths;
  • understanding of the influence of faith and belief on individuals, societies, communities and cultures;
  • skills of enquiry and response through the use of religious vocabulary, questioning and empathy;
  • skills of reflection, expression, application, analysis and evaluation of beliefs, values and practices, and the communication of personal responses to these.

 

Religious Education at Norwich Road Academy encourages pupils to:

  • consider challenging questions of the meaning and purpose of life; beliefs about God, the self and the nature of reality, issues of right and wrong and what it means to be human;
  • understand the influence of religion on individuals, families, communities and cultures;
  • learn from different religions, beliefs, values and traditions while exploring questions of meaning and their own beliefs;
  • learn about religious and ethical teaching, enabling them to make reasoned and informed responses to religious, moral and social issues;
  • develop their sense of identity and belonging, preparing them for life as citizens in a plural, global society;
  • develop respect for and sensitivity to others, in particular those whose faiths and beliefs are different from their own.

 

Religious Education at Norwich Road Academy enhances pupils:

  • awareness and understanding of religions and beliefs, teachings, practices and forms of expression;
  • ability to reflect on, consider, analyse, interpret and evaluate issues of truth, belief, faith and ethics and to communicate their responses.

 

Religious Education at Norwich Road Academy offers:

  • opportunities for personal reflection and spiritual development.

 

We achieve this through, but not limited to:

  • observing children – to see how they tackle a task and how well they use their skills and knowledge
  • asking questions – to challenge thinking and ascertain understanding.
  • working alongside children in group work – to be able to adapt/extend their learning, and provide personalised learning opportunities and challenge
  • encouraging self and peer assessment – helping children to understand their learning journey
  • giving verbal feedback – to help children identify how well they have done, and what they need to learn next
  • marking children’s work – affirming their achievement and identifying next steps